This Momentary Beast

Occasionally we think of our lives and how they are affected by our sin.  (Usually we are more consumed with how the sin of others affects our lives, but we’ll set that aside for the moment.) At a certain point also some of us consider how our sin, stretching back to Adam, has affected Creation, corrupting literally the entire world.  There is nothing our sin has not tainted.

And so – I thought, which is always a dangerous thing – what about time itself?  How has our sin, collectively and individually, affected time?  We unconsciously think in terms of aging and decay: everything fades with time.  Even when we talk about enjoying the moment, we lie to ourselves.  Every moment we find ourselves enjoying is in the past by the time we realize it has brought us happiness.  We are grasping at our histories even as we seize the day.

The greatest joys of our life become wearisome to us, given enough time.  And what is this, but the greatest of sin’s corruptions? Given an eternity to worship our Creator, we chose to steal a moment of sinful pleasure, and we’ve been doing it ever since.

We took the beauty and wonder of eternal discovery, eternal growth, eternal intimacy, and we corrupted it through our sin into nothing more than a relentless destroyer, a slavering beast.  And beast it remains, devouring each second of our lives.  It knows neither joy nor remorse: and beauty having become beast, it slips its fangs between the seconds, rending our futures instantaneously into our pasts.  Fears and hopes, joys and sorrows, they become, as the great Preacher said, vanity.  The beast we call the present devours all.

Or perhaps this explains it better: there are whiny children at Disneyland.

Through the wide, ever-hungering jaws of the present every moment of the future in this world must pass.  Until…

Until our mockery of God’s creative power – our sin, our efforts to remake everything in our own image, our twisting of dominion into rebellion – ceases.  For while the beast is sovereign over every single moment of human history since Genesis 3, it reigns at the sufferance of a Sovereign greater still.  And that Sovereign is set not simply on redeeming men, but every aspect of His glorious Creation.

Consider this.  There will be a moment when weariness ceases.  When hope beyond anything we’ve ever dared to hope is realized, and does not become part of the past, but an eternal victorious moment in which we dwell forever.

“Further up,” C. S. Lewis cried out in The Last Battle, “and further in!”  I hope he gets to lead us up the mountain one day, for I will gladly (truly, unabashedly glad for perhaps the very first time in my immortal existence) follow.

And the Present will sleep contently at the foot of its King, hunger sated.

Law: A More Excellent Way

If civil law is simply a social contract, then it rests on a foundation no firmer than desire. If ethics spring forth from the human heart, what then of the higher things – or indeed, how do we recognize the higher as distinct from the base? For my desire to steal I merely enshrine in law, and it becomes ethical: a virtue. I posit that some people are not really people; killing them is no different than butchering a hog. Again, I look in the mirror and see an ethical man, for my desire – become law – tells me what it means to be good. But what, then, of honor? What of duty? What of self-sacrificing love? What place have these things?

No, my friends. We must categorically reject the thinking of this age. There is transcendent truth, and it is real. We recognize love, and honor, and duty. When their stories are told, our spirits soar. We rejoice. And we cannot resist them, for indeed, desire does not define virtue. Virtue is written on the human heart, by One far greater than us. We can seek to understand this. We can embark on the greatest journey of our lives. The alternative is to be caught up by our own desires, slaves to their fickle whims, never satisfied, endlessly manipulating each other. There is no heavier burden for men to bear than that of their own desire.

Yet take heart, for all is not lost. There is a glorious, transcendent, and firm foundation upon which to build. And it is never too late to place upon it the first stone of a more excellent way.

Catechized: Confessions & Reflections (11)

Q. 11. What are God’s works of providence?
A. God’s works of providence are, his most holy, wise, and powerful preserving and governing all his creatures, and all their actions.

(Click here for a great Q&A over at Reformed.org)

Let me suggest there are two simple premises to sound theology.

First, that God wills perfectly. What He has decreed with happen, without any doubt, down to the seemingly-random casting of lots (Prov 16:33). His promises are more dependable that the sun rising in the East, or the rising temperatures of summer.

Second, that Man sins willfully. By this we mean that man sins in what he does, for by nature and by deed, we are hell-bent on rebellion against our Creator. Some of our deeds are obviously sinful, at least to most: when a man murders another, for example, in violation of the sixth commandment (Ex 20:13). Others are more subtly sinful, for they benefit our fellow man instead of harming him: when we donate to the local children’s hospital to our own glory instead of His (John 3:19-21). Sinners sin, and in no ways can they glorify God in their actions, for they do not seek His glory: none ever has (Rom 3:9-11). Either a work is done of faith by one who loves Him, or it is sin. We recognize with Christ that sins differ in their extremity (John 19:1-11), but we all follow our father, Adam, consistently, and we act in accordance with our hearts.

Beyond these simple truths we need to develop our ideas precisely, and with an eye toward the consequences of our ideas. We should move slowly. We must work outward from the Word alone, allowing Scripture to speak to us while not allowing our culture to speak through Scripture. This is difficult to do, even for the very wise, but the Spirit indwells us if we are his, and God above has given us the writings of many wise men who came before us. It is possible for us to know, and in so knowing, to obey, and so increase His glory within our land.

 

Of Wonder and Deep Magic

Consider this: the soul-soaring delight of a child receiving a gift upon which his heart was set. This is a wonder.

Consider this also: how the child’s delight pales in comparison to the joy of the parent, the gift-giver. This, too, is a wonder, and brushes the edge of a deep magic.

To understand this is to understand the heart of the True King.

18.5% of Us are Dead*

The American Empire, when the sun of history sets on it, will go down as one of the most monstrous and deadly of all time. And it wasn’t even a different people group we slaughtered… we devoured our own children, for no better reason than the fact that they were inconvenient to us, interfering with our pleasure and indulgence. God have mercy. Since 1973, we have killed over 54 million [edit: actually 57 million] of our children. OUR OWN CHILDREN. The numbers are so large they almost cease to mean anything to us. Yet we consider the Nazis the face of evil, who murdered approximately 6 million Jews. And they were evil, terribly evil, and we are out-killing them 9-to-1 and counting, while considering ourselves good and right. And please keep in mind, as you move to vote in November, the Democrats think murder on this scale is a fundamental “right”, and the Republicans have repeatedly chosen to continue funding this “right”. Neither should receive the votes of God-fearing men. Make no mistake, there will be a reckoning for this. Evil does not go unpunished. True patriotism is this: we must repent, and we must remove the evil men and women who would do this from positions of power.

*The 2010 Census reported there are 308.7 million Americans; using the number of total abortions at 57 million, that is 18.46% of the current US population.

Shadow-born

It has been some time since my last post, but I have been working on a new poem I thought I’d share. Perhaps enjoy is the wrong word, but, you know, read. And ponder.

Shadow-born, in darkness we,
Who labor all ‘neath dying star,
And long for peace amidst long war,
For green amidst long greying scars.

Sorrow-born, in mourning we,
Who trudge with ever-slowing step,
As languid days grind bones to dust,
We move from dream to want to must.

Sightless-born, and fools we,
To ever seek and never find,
To build the tow’r, to touch the sky
And never truly wonder why.

-Charles Baldon, May 2015

Do Not Fear the Darkness, Love

Do not fear the darkness, love,
No monsters hunt you in the night;
So do not fear the darkness, love,
Let terrors fade with fading light.

Close your eyes and sleep, my love,
Lie safe within my arms this night;
Yes, close your eyes and sleep, my love,
Know peace until the morning light.

Do not fear the darkness, love,
Dream your dreams in hope this night;
No, do not fear the darkness, love,
And rest to rise with rising light.

-Charles Baldon, November 2014